Exhibitions and Events

Japan-made Majolica Tiles ―Trail of Inspiration
INAX MUSEUMS

Japan-made Majolica Tiles ―Trail of Inspiration

November 3 (Sat), 2018 ~ April 9 (Tue), 2019

Japan-made Majolica tiles are multi-colored relief tiles created in Japan during the beginning of the Taisho era and the first decade of the Showa era that emulate the Victorian tiles of modern England.


When selling these multi-colored wares, leading British tile makers named them 'Majolica tiles' in order to reflect their roots in Italian and Spanish maiolica pottery--and the subsequent Japan-made version kept this name intact.


Seeing the Victorian tiles that were used when constructing Westerners' residences following the Meiji Restoration, architects in Japan called for their domestic production after being drawn toward their beautiful designs, as well as their functional elements such as resistance to both fire and water.


Pioneer manufacturers of interior tiles began researching fabrication methods, and after establishing a dry press forming method in around 1907 (year 40 of the Meiji era), they began creating Majolica tiles in Japan. During the height of their export during 1931 and 1932 (years six and seven of the Showa era), the tiles traveled as far as Southeast Asia, India, Central and South America, Australia and Africa. Recently, there has also been a "Majolica tile boom" in Taiwan.


Clearly, then, Japan-made Majolica tiles―which were created after being inspired by British tiles--are poised for popularity, as well as for a continuing trail of inspiration around the globe.


INAX MUSEUMS


  • Japan-made Majolica Tile, 20c
  • Japan-made Majolica Tile, Fujimi ware, 20c
  • Sarasa Nishijin, Kyoto
  • CATALOGUE OF SAJI TILE WORKS, 20c
  • Japan-made Majolica Tile, 20c
    photo: Toshihide Kajihara
  • Japan-made Majolica Tile, Fujimi ware, 20c
    photo: Toshihide Kajihara
  • Sarasa Nishijin, Kyoto
    photo: Toshihide Kajihara
  • CATALOGUE OF SAJI TILE WORKS, 20c
    photo: Toshihide Kajihara
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