Exhibitions and Events

Introduction by Kengo KUMA
Nineteenth century architectural theorist, Gottfried Semper, coined a concept that production of architecture is fundamentally a process of weaving. He reached this idea by observing various villages in the world. Our laboratory investigates the possibilities of weaving through many projects and other activities. This includes our ongoing pavilion project in Australia that is shown in this exhibition, which is produced through a reckless weaving process.

Kengo Kuma



Introduction of the Exhibiton
This exhibition introduces the Kengo Kuma Laboratory at The University of Tokyo Department of Architecture, founded in 2009, through the word "Weaving".


"Weaving Things"
Many of Kuma lab's design projects can be understood as a pursuit of different types of weaving of different kinds of things. From plastic rod, timberto metal sheet, or even further, to road composing a city, we have worked with things with diverse solidities and scales and to develop new ways of weaving.


"Weaving People"
For developing new ways of weaving, it is important that the laboratory itself functions as a platform for people with different ideas to be woven. There are always about 40 students in our laboratory and almost half of them are international students who are from various regions and countries of the world. By weaving ideas from people with different philosophical and cultural backgrounds, we produce new ways of weaving.


"Weaving Fields"
It is also important to keep ourselves woven not only within the laboratory but with fields outside of architecture. We have been working to integrate knowledge from various fields such as structural engineering, computer science, fashion design and many more, through collaborations in design projects and lecture series'.


The exhibition will represent various forms of "Weaving" from the Kuma lab including a full scale mock up installation of a pavilion which is planned to be constructed in Canberra, Australia. We hope you enjoy engaging with our activities by being woven into this exhibition.


Toshiki Hirano
(Assistant Professor, Kengo Kuma Laboratory, The University of Tokyo Department of Architecture)


  • Weaving process of Acrylic rods for Canberra Pavilion(tentative), Australia
  • Mock-up for Canberra Pavilion(tentative), Australia
  • Wooden joint system of ’KODAMA' pavilion
  • Wooden joint system of 'Wood Cloud'
  • Japanese paper denim curtains of Former Waki Elementary School
  • Shell screen of Former Oki Nursery School
  • Weaving process of Acrylic rods for Canberra Pavilion(tentative), Australia
    photo: Kengo Kuma Laboratory, The University of Tokyo
  • Mock-up for Canberra Pavilion(tentative), Australia
  • Wooden joint system of ’KODAMA' pavilion
  • Wooden joint system of 'Wood Cloud'
  • Japanese paper denim curtains of Former Waki Elementary School
  • Shell screen of Former Oki Nursery School
Date 5 July - 25 September, 2018
Open Hours 10:00 - 18:00
Closed Wednesdays, 11-15 & 26 August
Admission Free
Planned and organized by LIXIL Corporation
Cooperation Kengo Kuma Laboratory, The University of Tokyo Department of Architecture / Kengo Kuma and Associates

Profile

Kengo KUMA

Kengo Kuma was born in 1954. He completed his master’s degree at the University of Tokyo in 1979. After studying at Columbia University as Visiting Scholar, he established Kengo Kuma & Associates 1990. In 2009, he was installed as Professor at the Graduate School of Architecture, University of Tokyo.
Among Kuma’s major works are Kirosan Observatory (1995), Water/Glass (1995, received AIA Benedictus Award), Stage in Forest, Toyoma Center for Performance Arts (received 1997 Architectural Institute of Japan Annual Award), Bato-machi Hiroshige Museum (received The Murano Prize). Recent works include Nezu Museum (2009, Tokyo), Yusuhara Marche and Wooden Bridge Museum (2010), Asakusa Culture and Tourism Center (2012), Nagaoka City Hall Aore. (2012), and Kabukiza (2013). Outside Japan, Besancon Music Center, FRAC Marseilles Aix-en-Provence Conservatoire, and China Academy of Arts’ Folk Art Museum have been completed recently, with lots of major projects being underway, including V&A at Dundee, UK.
Kuma is also a prolific writer and his books have been translated into English, Chinese and Korean, obtaining wide readership from around the world. The latest titles are Natural Architecture and Small Architecture, published from Architectural Association.

photo: © J.C. Carbonne

  • July, 2018
  • July, 2018
  • July, 2018
  • July, 2018
    photo:Chieko Shiraishi
  • July, 2018
    photo:Chieko Shiraishi
  • July, 2018
    photo:Chieko Shiraishi
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